Quitting

Help friends and family

Someone who feels supported during their quit has a greater chance of quitting for good. You can play an important role in helping someone you love become smoke-free.

Tell them about QuitNow

FREE quit smoking support services: QuitNow offers free support services to help British Columbians quit smoking. We bundle all of our services under something we call a Quit Plan.  Learn about it and refer friends and family. Check out our downloadable Family and Friends Smart Steps booklet for more information.

Fully covered supplies of nicotine replacement therapy and prescription medications: The BC government offers a 3-month supply of nicotine replacement therapy or prescription medications through Pharmacare to those who qualify. Learn about the PharmaCare BC Smoking Cessation Program here.

Online community: Help is what our community forum and our Facebook community is all about. They're places where those ready to quit smoking can get support from others going through the process of becoming or staying tobacco-free.

Tips to help others quit

1. Ask what you can do to help. Everyone has different needs.
Don't start offering unsolicited advice. If they want space, give it to them. Let them know you're available, and if they need you, they'll come to you.
2. Be understanding and patient.
Irritability and crankiness are common symptoms of nicotine withdrawal. These moods will pass, but in the meantime, give your friend a break. Get informed about the side effects of withdrawal and cravings common during the quitting process.
3. Never nag. It will only make them feel worse.
If you stress them out, you'll push them right back into that old vice. Slips and relapse happens, and smokers rarely quit on their first attempt. In order to pick themselves up and try again, they need to feel supported and encouraged - not shamed.
4. Offer to do smoke-free activities.
It’s difficult for someone trying to quit to be around others who smoke. Even if you are a person who smokes, you can suggest doing smoke-free activities like going to the movies or a favorite restaurant.
5. Celebrate their successes.
Quitting is a big deal. Acknowledge when they have reached key milestones like being smoke-free for one week, one month or one year and help them celebrate by doing something special. Point out the positive changes you’ve noticed since they quit, like having more energy. A compliment can build their confidence and ongoing resolve to quit.